Malaria – Victimization

Did you know….

that we have certain archetypal disease patterns that we bring into this world with us, and that lie at the root of many of our health problems? You did if you have been reading these blogs regularly. Our last blog spoke about the first of these chronic inherited disease archetypes, Psora. The theme of Psora is that of a poverty consciousness.

If you have been reading these blogs, you would also know that the chronic miasms have a certain order to them in the way in which they developed, and also how they are treated in most cases. After Psora, the first of the chronic miasms, we find Malaria.

Malaria used to be endemic around the world, including in Europe and North America, as an acute disease, but is now confined to only a few, mostly tropical places. In most of the world, acute malaria is gone, but has become a chronic,  largely unknown disease, producing and hiding behind many acute conditions that are given fancy names, from Greek or Latin, based on the main symptoms. These conventional ‘names’ aren’t very helpful as they don’t tell us or the person seeking to treat them what the cause is, so treatment amounts to suppressing the symptoms. But the underlying cause remains, and the disease(s) continue, just now deeper inside you and getting stronger as you get weaker. It’s ‘healthcare by proxy’ or ‘healthcare by hook or by crook’ – if you can’t get rid of the cause, then get rid of the evidence and pretend you fixed the problem.

Malaria produces many conditions involving the digestive system, in particular the liver. And the liver is the basis for our energy, our ability to digest food, but also life in general. With a weak liver, we also tend to feel generally weak, unable to handle the demands of the world, and psychologically, we start to feel like we are victims and the world with its many demands is oppressive and unfair.

The characteristic time for Malaria to manifest in most people is in the late Fall, from late October to early December, following the season of Psora (early Fall). The state of mind of Psora, of not having enough, coincides with the waning days of summer, the approach of the colder weather, shorter days, less sunshine, and the dying of nature’s vegetative cover of the earth. Malaria then follows, with the colder, damper and stormier days of late Fall, where we feel like nature is against us, the reprieve of ‘Indian Summer’ now gone and the harshness of winter soon to come upon us. Of course, these chronic miasms are not dependent upon the weather, and can manifest regardless of geography. To an experienced practitioner, the manifestations of each of the chronic miasms can be seen in the various symptoms that can flare up at certain times of the year. Every November, I used to get depressed by the damp, cold weather, get periodic fevers and feel very cold, seeking out warmth and feeling generally like the world was not a welcoming place. These symptoms were very familiar to me, as I had contracted malaria, the acute disease miasm in my youth when working and travelling in Asia and the Pacific. I had treated for the acute malaria, but the deeper, underlying chronic malarial miasm was still there. However, once I learned about it and treated for it, my seasonal malarial symptoms also ended.

Treating for Malaria, as for Psora, and all the other chronic miasms we’ll talk about can make a large difference in your overall health, and prevent other problems from emerging later in life. Even if the chronic miasms are not affecting you seemingly now, they are latent, and waiting to be activated by some event, and once activated can cause significant health issues. Next time we’ll talk about the chronic miasm following on Malaria, Tuberculosis, behind all the colds and flus we tend to suffer from in winter. Stay tuned.

For more information about Heilkunst treatment and studies please visit our website.

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